Voltigeurs Armoury

Client: Public Services and Procurement Canada

Location: 805, avenue Wilfrid-Laurier, Quebec City, Quebec

Year of project completion: 2018

In Joint Venture with: Architecture 49, STGM

The 1887 Armoury, a “Classified” National Historic Site of Canada, is an excellent example of Canada’s Chateau style, with its fenestration, candle-snuffer towers, buttresses, massive masonry and imposing copper roof. Its 1914 east expansion added office space, a Mess, Quartermaster and Guardhouse.

On April 4th, 2008, when fire largely destroyed the building, 90% of the masonry survived. Major project components are: rehabilitating the 1914 wing for offices, reconstruction and conversion of the Infantry Drill Hall to a grand multifunction room for 1300 people, a regimental museum, a new west office wing, restoration of interior and exterior massive masonry walls, restoration of plaster, doors, windows and interior finishes, and a new roof including decorative metalwork.

Incorporating structural, mechanical, electrical and civil engineering, life safety, acoustical and scenographic design proved challenging in this historic building, requiring solutions with minimal intervention, and conservation of the surviving heritage building components.

Photos: Stéphane Groleau, DFS

Client: Public Services and Procurement Canada

Location: 805, avenue Wilfrid-Laurier, Quebec City, Quebec

Year of project completion: 2018

In Joint Venture with: Architecture 49, STGM

The 1887 Armoury, a “Classified” National Historic Site of Canada, is an excellent example of Canada’s Chateau style, with its fenestration, candle-snuffer towers, buttresses, massive masonry and imposing copper roof. Its 1914 east expansion added office space, a Mess, Quartermaster and Guardhouse.

On April 4th, 2008, when fire largely destroyed the building, 90% of the masonry survived. Major project components are: rehabilitating the 1914 wing for offices, reconstruction and conversion of the Infantry Drill Hall to a grand multifunction room for 1300 people, a regimental museum, a new west office wing, restoration of interior and exterior massive masonry walls, restoration of plaster, doors, windows and interior finishes, and a new roof including decorative metalwork.

Incorporating structural, mechanical, electrical and civil engineering, life safety, acoustical and scenographic design proved challenging in this historic building, requiring solutions with minimal intervention, and conservation of the surviving heritage building components.

Photos: Stéphane Groleau, DFS

Based on Eugène Étienne Taché’s original sketches, the fleur-de-lys, maple leaf and rotating flag ornamental ridge crest was reproduced.

The limestone facing, buttresses and half of the brick substrate wall were rebuilt. Any original limestone that was still in good condition was carefully removed, numbered, stored and reinstalled in its original position on the wall.

Conversion of the former Drill Hall into a multi-purpose hall with scenographic features and technical walkways. The new roof structure in exposed timber is reminiscent of the conditions that existed before the fire. Fragments of charred wood can be seen on the brick walls, evidence of the 2008 fire.

Contemporary language has been used in new interventions to allow a clearer understanding of the historical components and the evolution of the site.

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