Erskine and American Church

restoration - Canadian Art Pavilion

Client: Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Location: 1339 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec

Year of project completion: 2010

The project had the dual objectives of converting the 1894 Erskine and American church building to the new Pavilion of Canadian Art, and the restoration of the historic church’s envelope. This historic church, designed by the architect A.C. Hutchison, is one of the best examples in Quebec of the principles of the renowned American architect, H.H. Richardson, with its use of polychrome natural stone (solid limestone and Miramichi sandstone), brutalism and Romanesque vocabulary. In 2006 the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts acquired the Erskine and American church building and directly mandated DFS as conservation architects, while others were engaged to convert the interior of the building to museum functions.

The conservation project entailed restoration of stone masonry and windows, including Tiffany glass conservation and reinsertion, west steeple copper roofing restoration, roof slate repairs, roofing of the exposed floors of both steeples, and foundation waterproofing. The portion of the church above the new underground tunnel, between the church and Hornstein Hall was dismantled and rebuilt.

Client: Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Location: 1339 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec

Year of project completion: 2010

The project had the dual objectives of converting the 1894 Erskine and American church building to the new Pavilion of Canadian Art, and the restoration of the historic church’s envelope. This historic church, designed by the architect A.C. Hutchison, is one of the best examples in Quebec of the principles of the renowned American architect, H.H. Richardson, with its use of polychrome natural stone (solid limestone and Miramichi sandstone), brutalism and Romanesque vocabulary. In 2006 the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts acquired the Erskine and American church building and directly mandated DFS as conservation architects, while others were engaged to convert the interior of the building to museum functions.

The conservation project entailed restoration of stone masonry and windows, including Tiffany glass conservation and reinsertion, west steeple copper roofing restoration, roof slate repairs, roofing of the exposed floors of both steeples, and foundation waterproofing. The portion of the church above the new underground tunnel, between the church and Hornstein Hall was dismantled and rebuilt.

Designed by Tiffany studios of New York in 1903, this cycle of windows is the largest collection of Tiffany religious stained glass in Canada to date.

A local conservator worked in collaboration with DFS to restore a total of 17 heritage stained glass panels with a collective value of $4.5M.

The equivalent of one kilometre of sandstone band was used to replace the badly eroded Miramichi bands, over the entire height of the bell tower.

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